students sitting in theater

FilmEd Classroom

FilmEd Classroom is our brand new film education portal. FilmEd features a K-8 curriculum designed to provide meaningful arts engagement, support media literacy, and hone critical-thinking skills. Here you’ll find free films and learning materials to lead meaningful conversations and arts experiences with your students.

Our free, grade-based lesson plans include live action, documentary, and animated short films by a diverse, talented group of local and international filmmakers. Each film is accompanied by a film guide with teaching instructions and suggestions. FilmEd’s inaugural theme is Identity. Additional FilmEd materials and expanded themes will be released throughout the school year.


Using NYICFF FilmEd Classroom, teachers can expect to:

  • Provide meaningful arts engagement and bolster arts education
  • Support media literacy and broaden literacy studies
  • Hone critical thinking skills
  • Foster social-emotional learning
  • Explore important themes through the powerful medium of film
  • Share diverse stories, in a range of styles and genres, that spark shared dialogue and mutual understanding

Explore the Portal

Know a teacher? Tell them about NYICFF Classroom!

NYICFF is committed to broad access to the arts for all children. We are proud to provide FilmEd Classroom for free to all students and classrooms. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, NYICFF relies on the support of our audience members and supporters to make this program possible.

Please consider making a donation to support this important initiative.

To learn more about corporate or philanthropic sponsorship of the FilmEd program, please contact development@nyicff.org.

The Cornelia T. Bailey
Foundation

NYICFF FilmEd Classroom is supported in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, with support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. This project was supported in part by funds provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.